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A simple idea, of nature colliding with man-made machines, and executed in a stark manner that helps drives the message home. Plus a shutter released at just the right time. by Özant Kamaci

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Beautiful semi-advertisement, all art “sound sculptures” by the team at Dentsu London, for Canon Pixma Printers. Art direction by Christopher Hewitt.

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Beautiful semi-advertisement, all art “sound sculptures” by the team at Dentsu London, for Canon Pixma Printers. Art direction by Christopher Hewitt.

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In trying to explain the abstract and un-explainable (how do you explain an irrational phobia to someone who does not suffer from the same?), Raquel Figuera’s efforts results in scenes that are provocative, intuitive and extremely beautiful.

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By filling the turbine hall at the Tate Modern with 500,000 porcelain replicas of sunflower seeds, Ai WeiWei convinces the world the artistry and mass-market, mass-production power of the world’s second largest economy. Each seed is hand-made, hand-painted, and carpets the entire space of the huge hall. Visitors are then encouraged the walk all over the exhibit… a comment on the disposability of mass-replicated art? via designboom

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Luciano is quite the maverick when it comes to amazing colours and illustrations that just simply work. Simply beautiful infographics as well, in his, frankly, stunning portfolio of work spanning quite a few disciplines. His installation proposal is my favourite.

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Lines and blocks of colours make up surreal landscapes and dimensions, in paintings by James Marshall.

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Mysterious and immensely colourful, Caleb Charland’s photographic images created by bacteria just makes sense.

The “Bacteria” project was conceived when Charland’s curiosity led him to relinquish control of the image-making process by introducing bacteria to his film. By consuming the gelatin emulsion and re-depositing and repositioning the image particles, the bacteria create patterns and shapes, not dissimilar to those left behind by other natural processes. These remarkable images are a biograph, evidence of a bacterial life cycle, an index of existence.

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Karim Rashid has always been experimenting with curvaceous graphics and product design. Taking that obsession to the latest high is his exhibition at Spoke Club in Toronto. Called Data Driven, this is an abstract art outing that combines science and art and bright fun summer colours of Fujifilm. via Designboom.

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Beautiful sepia-tinged images of the Taj Mahal by photographer Thamer Al-Tassan.

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Artist Hektor Memet’s range of daily objects re-appropriated into Dadaist art pieces is both intriguing and thought-provoking.

Inverted bicycles, chairs balanced on legs shooting out at bizarre angles and a glass in which wine is perfectly sealed away by an invisible lid– a close inspection of Hektor Mamet’s work will always reveal an artist concerned with his fascination for our responses to the useless. How we value these once perfectly functional objects now rendered into contorted optical illusions says a lot about who we are. Whether we respond with humour or frustration, Mamet’s assisted ready-made’s refute our notions of value at their most basic levels, and at the same time insist upon a reappraisal in completely different terms– those of our passions, emotions and perceptions. They touch us, in ways which are familiar to the thinking of the artist, but which seldom enter the perceptual realm of  the vast majority of the viewers who will encounter Mamet’s work, since our day to day lives are ordered and dictated on strictly ordered hierarchies of value and interest which here loose all point of reference. The result, as often as not, is laughter.

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Artist Hektor Memet’s range of daily objects re-appropriated into Dadaist art pieces is both intriguing and thought-provoking.

Inverted bicycles, chairs balanced on legs shooting out at bizarre angles and a glass in which wine is perfectly sealed away by an invisible lid– a close inspection of Hektor Mamet’s work will always reveal an artist concerned with his fascination for our responses to the useless. How we value these once perfectly functional objects now rendered into contorted optical illusions says a lot about who we are. Whether we respond with humour or frustration, Mamet’s assisted ready-made’s refute our notions of value at their most basic levels, and at the same time insist upon a reappraisal in completely different terms– those of our passions, emotions and perceptions. They touch us, in ways which are familiar to the thinking of the artist, but which seldom enter the perceptual realm of  the vast majority of the viewers who will encounter Mamet’s work, since our day to day lives are ordered and dictated on strictly ordered hierarchies of value and interest which here loose all point of reference. The result, as often as not, is laughter.

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As the story goes…

There is a tale in my family that has the mysterious allure of a pre-destination. As my father Lauro tells it, once our family name was Michelini. Then, one day my great-great grandfather, who used to travel to markets with a horse-drawn cart to sell pots and pans made of clay, had a misfortune: scared by an animal, the horse reared, throwing the cart and all the wares in a ditch. The family was nicknamed “pignaton” (in the local friulian language, the shattering of all pots), and over the generations, that became our last name.

I left Italy in my youth, with my companion (now my husband), Fausto Pellegrini, to pursue a dream and a passion for graphic design. We studied with one of the fathers of modern American graphic design, Milton Glaser, and ultimately directed our own studio. We lived in New York City for 20 years, and my encounter with the art of pottery took place in an atelier on the East Side of Manhattan, where I learned to shape my growing passion for clay into forms that I longed for. The need to live a simpler and quieter family life made us return to our origins.

We now live in Udine, where I have been able to transform a dream into reality, working in my own pottery studio.The soul of my wares comes to life through a visual aesthetic, inherited from my background in graphic design, combined with the endless enjoyment of forming porcelain. I love the striking contrast of the pureness and whiteness of porcelain with the vivid colors and beautiful patterns of vintage kimono fabrics. I throw my pieces on the wheel and each piece becomes a unique creation as each shape is different and the kimono fabrics that I use are rare and of limited availability.

My studio is in a very quiet part of town and I really enjoy walking to work. The hypnotic feel of the spinning of the wheel and the sounds of the birds filling the air give me an inner feeling of calmness and balance. Along this new journey I began, I’m constantly inspired by the finest daughter, Gemma Minxin, who is always ready for new adventures and new discoveries, and by my life and work partner, Fausto Pellegrini whom, through our successful teamwork, has himself discovered the pleasure of creating objects with his hands.

I feel accomplished and I really enjoy taking time in refinishing my vases, as I don’t like to rush in my work. Besides…I know my ancestors are watching over me.

By Nadia Pignatone via Reflex Deco

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Fulvio Bonavia has quite in the magic touch in colliding the everyday objects with fragile flowers and plants, to stunning results.

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Daniel Reese paints shoes with modern pop culture references, making them instant wearable art that looks so good! How can anyone not love the Mario shoe?

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Daisy Lew has killer skills and brilliant concepts.

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Buy your beautiful hand-stamped wood block vintage maps from the lovely folks at Best Made Company.

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Beautiful house of books by Matej Krén at the MAMbo.

Scanner is an installation specifically conceived for MAMbo, the artist’s hugest to date. Krén has been carrying out this research all over the world since the 90s, taking his cue from an investigation of the impossibility for humans to reach final, definite goals, proposing instead a destabilizing individual experience.

Krén’s presence at MAMbo, his first in Italy, has been possible through the cooperation with LIC, Literárne informačné centrum – Bratislava (Center for Literary Information), a cultural association run by the Slovakian Republic’s Ministry of Culture; it is the ideal crowning of a series of events at Bologna’s Children Book Fair, whose 2010 edition has hosted Slovakia as guest of honor.

Throughout his career, Matej Krén, among the most important Slovakian contemporary artists, has focused mainly on the means of elaboration and transmission of knowledge, establishing suggestive links between their historical and ideological relativity and the experimentation with many forms of optical and perceptual illusion.

The narrow inside space, multiplied and complicated by mirrors, evoke a sensation of sublime terror, an alteration referring to a puzzling infinity itself created to destabilize conventional spatial habits. Mirrors become an instrument to create illusion and, at the same time, to unmask it. Since the public can easily see themselves reflected in a false infinite – thus discovering the illusion – the problem becomes the latency of perception.

Chosen because of their nature as seat of knowledge, as symbols of intrinsically human free thought, books are here “used” as raw materials for an artistic process existing and communicating on many distinct levels.

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Beautiful house of books by Matej Krén at the MAMbo.

Scanner is an installation specifically conceived for MAMbo, the artist’s hugest to date. Krén has been carrying out this research all over the world since the 90s, taking his cue from an investigation of the impossibility for humans to reach final, definite goals, proposing instead a destabilizing individual experience.

Krén’s presence at MAMbo, his first in Italy, has been possible through the cooperation with LIC, Literárne informačné centrum – Bratislava (Center for Literary Information), a cultural association run by the Slovakian Republic’s Ministry of Culture; it is the ideal crowning of a series of events at Bologna’s Children Book Fair, whose 2010 edition has hosted Slovakia as guest of honor.

Throughout his career, Matej Krén, among the most important Slovakian contemporary artists, has focused mainly on the means of elaboration and transmission of knowledge, establishing suggestive links between their historical and ideological relativity and the experimentation with many forms of optical and perceptual illusion.

The narrow inside space, multiplied and complicated by mirrors, evoke a sensation of sublime terror, an alteration referring to a puzzling infinity itself created to destabilize conventional spatial habits. Mirrors become an instrument to create illusion and, at the same time, to unmask it. Since the public can easily see themselves reflected in a false infinite – thus discovering the illusion – the problem becomes the latency of perception.

Chosen because of their nature as seat of knowledge, as symbols of intrinsically human free thought, books are here “used” as raw materials for an artistic process existing and communicating on many distinct levels.

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Give Shi Jindian some wires and a whole lot of time, and he will make you a wire frame replica of the Chiangjiang 750, is essentially a knockoff of the Russian military M72-M is for mototsikl-which was an evolutionary version of BMW’s 1938 R71 side. X-ray vision without the X-ray!

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