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Janna Syvanoja creates wonderfully dimensional jewellery from paper.

The process of making my recycled paperjewellery pieces, involves a slow, “natural” technique. By curving each slice of paper around the steelwire, one by one, one after another, it is as if the piece grows into its shape by itself. This way the character of wood, paper’s original material, is preserved in the piece — as is also the association to the whole organic world, the way it builds itself, being in constant change, traveling in time.

Printed paper has also an additional reality, the information it contains. Now, one can only see separate words and letters, that have been transformed into graphical patterns on the surface of the piece. The previous content of the material referred to communication between people — message and expression. A piece of jewellery is worn for the same purpose.

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Crafted out of wood and premium tan leather, the obvious question here is… Is that a wooden MMM wallet in your pocket, or are you just happy to see me?

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Riccardo Tisci at Givenchy does it again with his blend of considered/controlled luxe fashion, with the slightest hint of Goth. The pretty, feathery kind of Gothic beauty.

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A fun and quirky take on menswear by Parisian based fashion designer Walter van Beirendonck.

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A great use of digital image manipulation by Federico Cabrera for fashion brand GILLES ET DADA. I am loving how it looks like a modern, severe version of a tribe.

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Simple pieces and bold colours accented with a geometric texture makes Jill Sander one of the more alluring brands to have been shown so far. via GQ

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Now this is art. via Jak & Jill Blog

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Only Etro makes cow hide and paisley look like they belong together. via The Fashionisto

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Bright colours and strong prints! Opening Ceremony can do no wrong.

And I need to get my hands on those shoes…

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Fun, irrelevant and slightly crazy… Pauline Borca’s Spring Summer 2011 collection balances the right amount of craft, textures and prints to recreate the fantasy of just dressing up and having fun.

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Perfect for Chinese New Year and all the red packets that you are going to get. Buy it at thinkofthe.com

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Marloes Ten Bhomer created a rapid prototyped shoe that is built with two different materials to allow for each part to be replaced when it wears out. This looks really sexy, like stepping to a hard piece of acrylic and letting it envelope your feet.

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This credit card case from Paul Smith is right up my alley, in bright orange tie dye print on iguana leather, with purple stripped lining!

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RDAI was tasked with the latest Hermès boutique in the previous swimming pool of the Hotel Lutetia in Paris. Their solution of beautiful handcrafted wooden ‘huts’ with a flowing stairway leading into the shop is beautiful, immensely crafted and perfectly befitting of Hermès. via Contemporist

 

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How did Fendi campaigns look like spring 1993? How Balenciaga was Balenciaga pre Nicolas Ghesquiere? More than a style touchstone and history lesson, this is a look back into graphic trends and social trends, (boobs / no boobs?), old logos, and how luxury was presented way back then. That is the magic of The Style Registry.

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Blingy diamonds are not usually my thing, but this Cartier Crocodile watch is so beautiful I just have to share it! The delicate artistry of the realistic crocodile around the mechanical, precision engineered tourbillon is just such an exciting contrast! via the Luxist

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Aren’t these the most subversive but beautiful things ever! I want a silver talon grabbing my wrists anyday! by Pamela Love via Jak & Jil blog.

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This is perfect for anyone whose wardrobe is filled with only black and grey clothing. Come on.. you know you want to. By Lazy Oaf.

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The Pop Art of Patrick Nagel needs little introduction. His minimalist style defined an era with cool, seductive women that became the most iconic of any single generation. His elegant graphic work and his portrayal of the contemporary woman made figurative design before him look instantly old. Today his unique sensibility and style continue to resonate with generations of young designers, illustrators and artists who have found inspiration from his trend-setting style.

Nagel was in the forefront of a new wave of illustration in Los Angeles in the late 1970’s
and early 80’s, re-imagining the graphic arts and in the process defining Los Angeles as the epicenter of award-winning visual arts. It was a reciprocal relationship; Los Angeles influenced his evolving style and in return he left his indelible mark on the city and far beyond. Through cultural cross-pollination, his work absorbed the moment – from the fashion photography of Guy Bourdin and Helmut Newton to influencing the look of music videos by David Bowie, Robert Palmer and George Michael, to creating the album cover art of Duran Duran.

Patrick Nagel was born in Dayton, Ohio in 1945 and was raised in Orange County, California. After returning from his tour in Viet Nam, he studied fine art at Chouinard Art Institute and California State University, Fullerton where he received his BA in 1969 in painting and graphic design. He then taught at Art Center College of Design while simultaneously establishing himself as a free-lance designer and illustrator with memorable ads for Ballantine Scotch, IBM and covers for Harper’s magazine.

In the mid-70’s he began illustrating stories for Playboy magazine, bringing instant exposure and a large appreciative audience to his work. His years working with Playboy established him as the heir apparent to 50’s pin-up artist Alberto Vargas and gave Nagel the subject matter that he would continue to use to illustrate the newly liberated woman.

I am waiting to see this style of illustrations make a comeback. Fashion and Art, like all things, is cyclical after all.

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This unsettling art project by French artist and Hint friend Frederique Daubal. For her Hide and Seek photographic series, Frederique cut out pages from fashion magazines, sliced them into fringe and made them into masks resembling Muslim niqābs. It’s astatement on identity, transformation and what it means to be French today

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