urbantaster.com

Once in a long while, a project comes along and takes my breath away. The Metropol Parasol by J. MAYER H. Architects, billed as the largest wooden structure in the world, in its undulating beauty amongst the Spanish landscape, is one of these projects. I love the scale of it, rising just slightly above the city to instil the sense of awe, but not too much to overpower it. Photos by David Franck via Yatzer

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By opening up a shopping trolley, furniture artist Mike Bouchet turns an industrial object into a comfortable looking sun-lounger. via Designboom

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Something about red and blue handles on a diamond file makes me go ‘I WANT!’.

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Beautiful shiny surrealistic still life photography is right up my alley, especially these by Dutch photographer Wyne Veen.

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More superhero-inspired work! Flattened by Jeremy Brunet.

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Now this put a smile on my face! Pete Dungey did this!

If we planted one of those in every hole, it would be like a forest in the road.’ A series of public installations highlighting the problem of surface imperfections on Britain’s roads.

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Beautiful illustrative work by Greek illustrator  Alexis Marcou for Fuel.

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I like this. A lot.

Klem chair and bench by Tuyo Design. Made of American white oak, this bench and chair have colorful wool pillows that hug the back and seat. You can mix and match the pillows, too, for a customized look.

Via Design Milk.

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Jonathan Robson, ‘Cause life size LEGO helmets are cool’, and we agree! has created this super fun, life-size LEGO Space Helmet for kids that plays downloadable audio tracks for comics.

The concept designed by Jonathan Robson is based on a LEGO helmet with a gold space visor. The helmet acts as a headset for listening to the audio for LEGO comics as well as a role-playing toy. Once subscribed to Audio Comic, you’ll receive the LEGO comic through the post with your activation code to download the audio onto a USB brick. Simply slot the brick into the back of the helmet, put it on and enjoy the exciting LEGO Audio comic experience!

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Amazing works by Japanese artist Yosuke Goda.

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Awwww.…too sweet! Get it here!

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Fun Facebook icons by Leoard Savage.

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Such an amazing building with an equally stunning interior with tonnes of Rodin’s sculptures to match! The Soumaya Museum by FREE.  All photography by Adam Wiseman. www.adamphotogallery.com

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Aren’t these just so lovely? Called simply Bote, a Series of floating boats in cork and plastic for the Portuguese company Materia by BIG-GAME.

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Wahahaha! Via Clients From Hell.

Me: “How can I help you today, ma’am?”

Client: “Is e-mail internet”?

Me: “I beg your pardon?”

Client: “Is e-mail on the internet? I have no internet, can I still read my e-mail?”

Me: “Well yes, you must be able to get online to view your e-mail.”

Client: “Oh, dear. I can’t see my e-mail.”

Me: “Well, let’s see. Can you open up Internet Explorer for me and tell me what you see?”

Client: “Open what?”

Me: “Your browser, can you open up your browser?”

Client: “My…my…?”

Me: “What you click on when you want to browse the internet?”

Client: “I don’t use anything, I just turn my computer on, and it’s there.”

Me: “Okay. Do you see the little blue ‘e’ icon on your desktop?”

Client: “You mean I have to start writing letters again?”

Me: “I’m…what, I’m sorry?”

Client: “I don’t have any pens at my desk. I just want my e-mail again.”

Me: “No, ma’am, your desktop, on your computer screen. Can you click on the little blue ‘e’ on your computer screen for me?”

Client: “Oh, this is too much work. I’m too upset. Just send me my e-mail. Can’t you send me my e-mail?”

Me: “We…okay, ma’am. Can you tell me what color the lights are on your router right now?”

Client: “My what?”

Me: “The little box with green or possibly a couple of red lights on it right now — it’s most likely near your computer?”

Client: “Lights and boxes, boxes and lights, just get my e-mail for me.
Me: “My test is showing that you should be able to get online right now. Can you tell me what you’re seeing on your computer screen?”

Client: “It’s been the same thing for the last two hours.”

Me: “An error message?”

Client: “No, just stars. It’s black and moving stars.”

Me: “…Do you see your mouse next to your keyboard?”

Client: “Yes.”

Me: “Move it for me.”

Client: “Move it?”

Me: “Yes. Move it.”

Client: “My e-mail!”

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Great work by Danish design studio Flydende Lava Studio for a idea and innovation lab Fourmation.

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Taking measures” by Ignasi Aballí.

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Using huge stationeries to mark up eventual lettable space, Radford Wallis creates interest in the most unlikely venue.

Property developer Land Securities owned office space in 80 Victoria Street, London SW1. One vast floor’s space was due to be split into four sections and then let to separate companies. Agents showing prospective tenants around required something to demonstrate this clearly.

Shunning conventional signage, we went for maximum impact by creating four scaled-up stationery items, used to mark out the huge space. The giant objects were then positioned where the partitions would eventually be built.

 

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Look at you all sexy in Bamboo and Stainless Steel… the Nau Kleen Kanteen available here.

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Artist Scott Weaver began work on Rolling Through the Bay, an abstract toothpick sculpture of San Francisco, 35 years ago…Insane.

I have used different brands of toothpicks depending on what I am building. I also have many friends and family members that collect toothpicks in their travels for me. For example, some of the trees in Golden Gate Park are made from toothpicks from Kenya, Morocco, Spain, West Germany and Italy. The heart inside the Palace of Fine Arts is made out of toothpicks people threw at our wedding.

Via Design You Trust.

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